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My new book

Federico Miyara

Dear all,

My new book, Software-based acoustical measurements, has just been published by Springer as an e-book and hardcover book:

http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319558707

The book advocates for the use of free software such as Scilab, Octave, Flac, and of course, Audacity. I've included a whole chapter and an appendix on Audacity.

See contents here:

http://www.springer.com/cda/content/document/cda_downloaddocument/9783319558707-t1.pdf?SGWID=0-0-45-1608140-p180721895

Best regards,

Federico


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Re: My new book

Robert Hänggi
Congrats Federico

It sounds interesting from what I can see in the TOC.

Has it a lot of formulas and is there some sample code (Octave/Nyquist)?

In general, I would like to buy it but experience tells me that PDFs
are not especially accessible when it comes to scientific content.

Good luck and good sales.

Robert

On 07/06/2017, Federico Miyara <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> Dear all,
>
> My new book, /Software-based acoustical measurements/, has just been
> published by Springer as an e-book and hardcover book:
>
> http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319558707
>
> The book advocates for the use of free software such as Scilab, Octave,
> Flac, and of course, Audacity. I've included a whole chapter and an
> appendix on Audacity.
>
> See contents here:
>
> http://www.springer.com/cda/content/document/cda_downloaddocument/9783319558707-t1.pdf?SGWID=0-0-45-1608140-p180721895
>
> Best regards,
>
> Federico
>
>

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Re: My new book

Federico Miyara

Robert,

It has a lot of formulas, and it has several code excerpts, mainly for Scilab, which is very similar to Octave and Matlab (it is more stable than Octave, that is the reason why I chose it). There is no DRM in Springer books, you can just copy and paste as with any document you have written yourself. You can check this downloading chapter 2 on Uncertainty, which is available for free from the following link taken from the web page of the book:

http://www.springer.com/cda/content/document/cda_downloaddocument/9783319558707-c2.pdf?SGWID=0-0-45-1608076-p180721895

If you mean screen reader accessibility, I'm not quite sure how it works in the case of formulas. The book is also provided in EPUB format which is reputed to be the most accessible format. But I don't know whether it reads in a friendly way a formula whose original source is Latex.

Best regards,

Federico


On 07/06/2017 11:09, Robert Hänggi wrote:
Congrats Federico

It sounds interesting from what I can see in the TOC.

Has it a lot of formulas and is there some sample code (Octave/Nyquist)?

In general, I would like to buy it but experience tells me that PDFs
are not especially accessible when it comes to scientific content.

Good luck and good sales.

Robert

On 07/06/2017, Federico Miyara [hidden email] wrote:
Dear all,

My new book, /Software-based acoustical measurements/, has just been
published by Springer as an e-book and hardcover book:

http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319558707

The book advocates for the use of free software such as Scilab, Octave,
Flac, and of course, Audacity. I've included a whole chapter and an
appendix on Audacity.

See contents here:

http://www.springer.com/cda/content/document/cda_downloaddocument/9783319558707-t1.pdf?SGWID=0-0-45-1608140-p180721895

Best regards,

Federico


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Re: My new book

Robert Hänggi
Thanks Federico for providing the sample chapter.

Yes, I meant the formulas mainly.

This is an example output after opening the document in Acrobat Pro DC:

"For instance, starting from the measurement of the sound pressure
level in some point of a plane progressive wave (free field), it is
possible to estimate the particle velocity by means of the equation.
1 Lp
image
o
Uef ¼ q c Pref 1020; ð2:1Þ
where qo is the air density at equilibrium and c is the velocity of sound."

The most accessible format is currently html and formulas as MML.
Most of Wikipedia is nowadays accessible in this fashion but exporting
it to a PDF will result in a similar non-sensible output.
Some people report that formulas could be made accessible within PDFs
but I've not seen concrete samples yet.
Of course, there's always the possibility to provide the formulas as
external link to a webpage with MML content.
However, publishers are not keen to make this extra work for a
possibly insignificant part of the target audience.

Robert

On 07/06/2017, Federico Miyara <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> Robert,
>
> It has a lot of formulas, and it has several code excerpts, mainly for
> Scilab, which is very similar to Octave and Matlab (it is more stable
> than Octave, that is the reason why I chose it). There is no DRM in
> Springer books, you can just copy and paste as with any document you
> have written yourself. You can check this downloading chapter 2 on
> Uncertainty, which is available for free from the following link taken
> from the web page of the book:
>
> http://www.springer.com/cda/content/document/cda_downloaddocument/9783319558707-c2.pdf?SGWID=0-0-45-1608076-p180721895
>
>
>
> If you mean screen reader accessibility, I'm not quite sure how it works
> in the case of formulas. The book is also provided in EPUB format which
> is reputed to be the most accessible format. But I don't know whether it
> reads in a friendly way a formula whose original source is Latex.
>
> Best regards,
>
> Federico
>
>
> On 07/06/2017 11:09, Robert Hänggi wrote:
>> Congrats Federico
>>
>> It sounds interesting from what I can see in the TOC.
>>
>> Has it a lot of formulas and is there some sample code (Octave/Nyquist)?
>>
>> In general, I would like to buy it but experience tells me that PDFs
>> are not especially accessible when it comes to scientific content.
>>
>> Good luck and good sales.
>>
>> Robert
>>
>> On 07/06/2017, Federico Miyara <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> Dear all,
>>>
>>> My new book, /Software-based acoustical measurements/, has just been
>>> published by Springer as an e-book and hardcover book:
>>>
>>> http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319558707
>>>
>>> The book advocates for the use of free software such as Scilab, Octave,
>>> Flac, and of course, Audacity. I've included a whole chapter and an
>>> appendix on Audacity.
>>>
>>> See contents here:
>>>
>>> http://www.springer.com/cda/content/document/cda_downloaddocument/9783319558707-t1.pdf?SGWID=0-0-45-1608140-p180721895
>>>
>>> Best regards,
>>>
>>> Federico
>>>
>>>
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> Check out the vibrant tech community on one of the world's most
>> engaging tech sites, Slashdot.org! http://sdm.link/slashdot
>> _______________________________________________
>> audacity-devel mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/audacity-devel
>>
>
>

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Re: My new book

Bill Unruh
On Wed, 7 Jun 2017, Robert Hänggi wrote:

> Thanks Federico for providing the sample chapter.
>
> Yes, I meant the formulas mainly.
>

Nost of the physics community publishes in pdf and produces loads and loads of
furmulas in pdf, that look just fine. Go to www.arxiv.org and down load a pdf
version of the document. Most, but not all are produced from TeX.
Note why you are taling about html when what you want to publish is pdf I do
not know.

> This is an example output after opening the document in Acrobat Pro DC:
>
> "For instance, starting from the measurement of the sound pressure
> level in some point of a plane progressive wave (free field), it is
> possible to estimate the particle velocity by means of the equation.
> 1 Lp
> image
> o
> Uef ¼ q c Pref 1020; ð2:1Þ
> where qo is the air density at equilibrium and c is the velocity of sound."
>
> The most accessible format is currently html and formulas as MML.
But you want pdf you said.

> Most of Wikipedia is nowadays accessible in this fashion but exporting
> it to a PDF will result in a similar non-sensible output.
> Some people report that formulas could be made accessible within PDFs
> but I've not seen concrete samples yet.
> Of course, there's always the possibility to provide the formulas as
> external link to a webpage with MML content.
> However, publishers are not keen to make this extra work for a
> possibly insignificant part of the target audience.
>
> Robert
>
> On 07/06/2017, Federico Miyara <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> Robert,
>>
>> It has a lot of formulas, and it has several code excerpts, mainly for
>> Scilab, which is very similar to Octave and Matlab (it is more stable
>> than Octave, that is the reason why I chose it). There is no DRM in
>> Springer books, you can just copy and paste as with any document you
>> have written yourself. You can check this downloading chapter 2 on
>> Uncertainty, which is available for free from the following link taken
>> from the web page of the book:
>>
>> http://www.springer.com/cda/content/document/cda_downloaddocument/9783319558707-c2.pdf?SGWID=0-0-45-1608076-p180721895
>>
>>
>>
>> If you mean screen reader accessibility, I'm not quite sure how it works
>> in the case of formulas. The book is also provided in EPUB format which
>> is reputed to be the most accessible format. But I don't know whether it
>> reads in a friendly way a formula whose original source is Latex.
>>
>> Best regards,
>>
>> Federico
>>
>>
>> On 07/06/2017 11:09, Robert Hänggi wrote:
>>> Congrats Federico
>>>
>>> It sounds interesting from what I can see in the TOC.
>>>
>>> Has it a lot of formulas and is there some sample code (Octave/Nyquist)?
>>>
>>> In general, I would like to buy it but experience tells me that PDFs
>>> are not especially accessible when it comes to scientific content.
>>>
>>> Good luck and good sales.
>>>
>>> Robert
>>>
>>> On 07/06/2017, Federico Miyara <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>> Dear all,
>>>>
>>>> My new book, /Software-based acoustical measurements/, has just been
>>>> published by Springer as an e-book and hardcover book:
>>>>
>>>> http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319558707
>>>>
>>>> The book advocates for the use of free software such as Scilab, Octave,
>>>> Flac, and of course, Audacity. I've included a whole chapter and an
>>>> appendix on Audacity.
>>>>
>>>> See contents here:
>>>>
>>>> http://www.springer.com/cda/content/document/cda_downloaddocument/9783319558707-t1.pdf?SGWID=0-0-45-1608140-p180721895
>>>>
>>>> Best regards,
>>>>
>>>> Federico
>>>>
>>>>
>>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>> Check out the vibrant tech community on one of the world's most
>>> engaging tech sites, Slashdot.org! http://sdm.link/slashdot
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> audacity-devel mailing list
>>> [hidden email]
>>> https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/audacity-devel
>>>
>>
>>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Check out the vibrant tech community on one of the world's most
> engaging tech sites, Slashdot.org! http://sdm.link/slashdot
> _______________________________________________
> audacity-devel mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/audacity-devel
>
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Re: My new book

MartynShaw
In reply to this post by Federico Miyara
Hi Frederico

Thanks, this looks very nice.  If I were still in academia I would order a copy for the library, but fortunatly I am not.  I will forward to a friend who still is though.

TTFN
Martyn

On 7 June 2017 at 00:45, Federico Miyara <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear all,

My new book, Software-based acoustical measurements, has just been published by Springer as an e-book and hardcover book:

http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319558707

The book advocates for the use of free software such as Scilab, Octave, Flac, and of course, Audacity. I've included a whole chapter and an appendix on Audacity.

See contents here:

http://www.springer.com/cda/content/document/cda_downloaddocument/9783319558707-t1.pdf?SGWID=0-0-45-1608140-p180721895

Best regards,

Federico


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Re: My new book

Robert Hänggi
In reply to this post by Bill Unruh
On 07/06/2017, Bill Unruh <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Wed, 7 Jun 2017, Robert Hänggi wrote:
>
>> Thanks Federico for providing the sample chapter.
>>
>> Yes, I meant the formulas mainly.
>>
>
> Nost of the physics community publishes in pdf and produces loads and loads
> of
> furmulas in pdf, that look just fine. Go to www.arxiv.org and down load a
> pdf
> version of the document. Most, but not all are produced from TeX.

Thanks for the link. Seems to be a large repository.
> Note why you are taling about html when what you want to publish is pdf I
> do
> not know.

It is already published.
I don't mind the Pdf format. The problem is that mathematical content
is most of the time not accessible to visual impaired users.

The example I gave looks of course fine on screen but is unintelligibly
rendered as plain text.
There are two solutions, one is a format with support for math markup
language which let's us navigate all levels of a formula (eg, "in
exponent 5", "in denominator 3 times x")
The other is to embed a graphic with the appropriate alternative text
in a single line format such as
"y=log_10(2*pi**x)"
One can also get away with the pure LaTeX input "$frac{2}{5}". Not
nice to read but at least comprehensible with a bit of training.

Doing the inverse, namely OCR with such documents isn't easy either,
perhaps comparable to scanning  a musical score.

In summary, I just wanted to know if the investment would pay off for me.
For sighted users it is certainly so and worth a recommendation.

Regards
Robert


>
>> This is an example output after opening the document in Acrobat Pro DC:
>>
>> "For instance, starting from the measurement of the sound pressure
>> level in some point of a plane progressive wave (free field), it is
>> possible to estimate the particle velocity by means of the equation.
>> 1 Lp
>> image
>> o
>> Uef ¼ q c Pref 1020; ð2:1Þ
>> where qo is the air density at equilibrium and c is the velocity of
>> sound."
>>
>> The most accessible format is currently html and formulas as MML.
>
> But you want pdf you said.
>
>> Most of Wikipedia is nowadays accessible in this fashion but exporting
>> it to a PDF will result in a similar non-sensible output.
>> Some people report that formulas could be made accessible within PDFs
>> but I've not seen concrete samples yet.
>> Of course, there's always the possibility to provide the formulas as
>> external link to a webpage with MML content.
>> However, publishers are not keen to make this extra work for a
>> possibly insignificant part of the target audience.
>>
>> Robert
>>
>> On 07/06/2017, Federico Miyara <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>> Robert,
>>>
>>> It has a lot of formulas, and it has several code excerpts, mainly for
>>> Scilab, which is very similar to Octave and Matlab (it is more stable
>>> than Octave, that is the reason why I chose it). There is no DRM in
>>> Springer books, you can just copy and paste as with any document you
>>> have written yourself. You can check this downloading chapter 2 on
>>> Uncertainty, which is available for free from the following link taken
>>> from the web page of the book:
>>>
>>> http://www.springer.com/cda/content/document/cda_downloaddocument/9783319558707-c2.pdf?SGWID=0-0-45-1608076-p180721895
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> If you mean screen reader accessibility, I'm not quite sure how it works
>>> in the case of formulas. The book is also provided in EPUB format which
>>> is reputed to be the most accessible format. But I don't know whether it
>>> reads in a friendly way a formula whose original source is Latex.
>>>
>>> Best regards,
>>>
>>> Federico
>>>
>>>
>>> On 07/06/2017 11:09, Robert Hänggi wrote:
>>>> Congrats Federico
>>>>
>>>> It sounds interesting from what I can see in the TOC.
>>>>
>>>> Has it a lot of formulas and is there some sample code
>>>> (Octave/Nyquist)?
>>>>
>>>> In general, I would like to buy it but experience tells me that PDFs
>>>> are not especially accessible when it comes to scientific content.
>>>>
>>>> Good luck and good sales.
>>>>
>>>> Robert
>>>>
>>>> On 07/06/2017, Federico Miyara <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>>> Dear all,
>>>>>
>>>>> My new book, /Software-based acoustical measurements/, has just been
>>>>> published by Springer as an e-book and hardcover book:
>>>>>
>>>>> http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319558707
>>>>>
>>>>> The book advocates for the use of free software such as Scilab,
>>>>> Octave,
>>>>> Flac, and of course, Audacity. I've included a whole chapter and an
>>>>> appendix on Audacity.
>>>>>
>>>>> See contents here:
>>>>>
>>>>> http://www.springer.com/cda/content/document/cda_downloaddocument/9783319558707-t1.pdf?SGWID=0-0-45-1608140-p180721895
>>>>>
>>>>> Best regards,
>>>>>
>>>>> Federico
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>>> Check out the vibrant tech community on one of the world's most
>>>> engaging tech sites, Slashdot.org! http://sdm.link/slashdot
>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>> audacity-devel mailing list
>>>> [hidden email]
>>>> https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/audacity-devel
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> Check out the vibrant tech community on one of the world's most
>> engaging tech sites, Slashdot.org! http://sdm.link/slashdot
>> _______________________________________________
>> audacity-devel mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/audacity-devel
>>

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Re: My new book

Federico Miyara

Robert,

I've sent a query to the publisher on the accessibility of the EPUB version as regards formulas. I'll advise if I had a convincing answer.

Regards,

Federico


On 07/06/2017 21:53, Robert Hänggi wrote:
On 07/06/2017, Bill Unruh [hidden email] wrote:
On Wed, 7 Jun 2017, Robert Hänggi wrote:

Thanks Federico for providing the sample chapter.

Yes, I meant the formulas mainly.

Nost of the physics community publishes in pdf and produces loads and loads
of
furmulas in pdf, that look just fine. Go to www.arxiv.org and down load a
pdf
version of the document. Most, but not all are produced from TeX.
Thanks for the link. Seems to be a large repository.
Note why you are taling about html when what you want to publish is pdf I
do
not know.
It is already published.
I don't mind the Pdf format. The problem is that mathematical content
is most of the time not accessible to visual impaired users.

The example I gave looks of course fine on screen but is unintelligibly
rendered as plain text.
There are two solutions, one is a format with support for math markup
language which let's us navigate all levels of a formula (eg, "in
exponent 5", "in denominator 3 times x")
The other is to embed a graphic with the appropriate alternative text
in a single line format such as
"y=log_10(2*pi**x)"
One can also get away with the pure LaTeX input "$frac{2}{5}". Not
nice to read but at least comprehensible with a bit of training.

Doing the inverse, namely OCR with such documents isn't easy either,
perhaps comparable to scanning  a musical score.

In summary, I just wanted to know if the investment would pay off for me.
For sighted users it is certainly so and worth a recommendation.

Regards
Robert



        
This is an example output after opening the document in Acrobat Pro DC:

"For instance, starting from the measurement of the sound pressure
level in some point of a plane progressive wave (free field), it is
possible to estimate the particle velocity by means of the equation.
1 Lp
image
o
Uef ¼ q c Pref 1020; ð2:1Þ
where qo is the air density at equilibrium and c is the velocity of
sound."

The most accessible format is currently html and formulas as MML.
But you want pdf you said.

Most of Wikipedia is nowadays accessible in this fashion but exporting
it to a PDF will result in a similar non-sensible output.
Some people report that formulas could be made accessible within PDFs
but I've not seen concrete samples yet.
Of course, there's always the possibility to provide the formulas as
external link to a webpage with MML content.
However, publishers are not keen to make this extra work for a
possibly insignificant part of the target audience.

Robert

On 07/06/2017, Federico Miyara [hidden email] wrote:
Robert,

It has a lot of formulas, and it has several code excerpts, mainly for
Scilab, which is very similar to Octave and Matlab (it is more stable
than Octave, that is the reason why I chose it). There is no DRM in
Springer books, you can just copy and paste as with any document you
have written yourself. You can check this downloading chapter 2 on
Uncertainty, which is available for free from the following link taken
from the web page of the book:

http://www.springer.com/cda/content/document/cda_downloaddocument/9783319558707-c2.pdf?SGWID=0-0-45-1608076-p180721895



If you mean screen reader accessibility, I'm not quite sure how it works
in the case of formulas. The book is also provided in EPUB format which
is reputed to be the most accessible format. But I don't know whether it
reads in a friendly way a formula whose original source is Latex.

Best regards,

Federico


On 07/06/2017 11:09, Robert Hänggi wrote:
Congrats Federico

It sounds interesting from what I can see in the TOC.

Has it a lot of formulas and is there some sample code
(Octave/Nyquist)?

In general, I would like to buy it but experience tells me that PDFs
are not especially accessible when it comes to scientific content.

Good luck and good sales.

Robert

On 07/06/2017, Federico Miyara [hidden email] wrote:
Dear all,

My new book, /Software-based acoustical measurements/, has just been
published by Springer as an e-book and hardcover book:

http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319558707

The book advocates for the use of free software such as Scilab,
Octave,
Flac, and of course, Audacity. I've included a whole chapter and an
appendix on Audacity.

See contents here:

http://www.springer.com/cda/content/document/cda_downloaddocument/9783319558707-t1.pdf?SGWID=0-0-45-1608140-p180721895

Best regards,

Federico


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