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Volume Reduction

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Volume Reduction

Robert Anderson-4
I'm using Audacity 1.2.4 and have a number of music tracks (MP3 format) that I like to use as a platform bed for voiceover work, but the original recorded music volume is far too high.  Can I somehow  reduce the volume of a music already recorded or make a "second" recording -- with reduced volume? 
 
Again my thanks for a great product and service.
 
Regards,
Bob
 
Robert C. Anderson
225 Curtis Drive
Johnstown, PA 15904
Home: 814-266-2427
Business: 814-269-6597
http://www.rcandersonmarketing.com
http://bobanderson.voice123.com/
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Re: Volume Reduction

Richard Ash (audacity-help)
On Sat, 2005-12-31 at 17:13 -0500, Robert Anderson wrote:
> I'm using Audacity 1.2.4 and have a number of music tracks (MP3
> format) that I like to use as a platform bed for voiceover work, but
> the original recorded music volume is far too high.  Can I somehow
> reduce the volume of a music already recorded or make a "second"
> recording -- with reduced volume?

You can make an existing track quieter either with the amplify effect
(select a negative amplification), or by using the gain slider at the
left hand end of the track:
  http://audacity.sourceforge.net/manual-1.2/menu_effects.html#internal
  http://audacity.sourceforge.net/manual-1.2/track_controls.html

When recording new tracks the level can be reduced by turning down the
recording level control on the mixer toolbar:
   http://audacity.sourceforge.net/manual-1.2/toolbar_io.html

Richard Ash



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Re: Volume Reduction

Jorge Fábregas
On Sunday 01 January 2006 9:43 am, Richard Ash wrote:
> You can make an existing track quieter either with the amplify effect
> (select a negative amplification), or by using the gain slider at the
> left hand end of the track:

Hello Richard,

I just found out about using the gain slider at the left-hand on each track. I
always used the amplify effect.  My question is: wouldn't it be cool if the
waveform changed (real-time) as I move the gain slider?  I lowered the
gain...I then exported the audio and re-imported and then I could see the
reduced waveform...

Should this be a feautre request or it isn't there for a particular reason?

Thanks and happy new year!
Jorge


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Re: Volume Reduction

Richard Ash (audacity-help)
On Sun, 2006-01-01 at 16:23 -0400, Jorge Fábregas wrote:
> I just found out about using the gain slider at the left-hand on each track. I
> always used the amplify effect.  My question is: wouldn't it be cool if the
> waveform changed (real-time) as I move the gain slider?  I lowered the
> gain...I then exported the audio and re-imported and then I could see the
> reduced waveform...
>
> Should this be a feautre request or it isn't there for a particular reason?

The reason it doesn't happen is because the amplify effect changes the
audio stored on disk, where as the volume slider doesn't.

When you amplify a section, the data is read from the disk, multiplied
by a number to do the amplification, and written back to disk in a new
file, and then the waveform of that new file calculated and drawn. This
is why it's quite slow.

When you use the gain slider all that happens is that a note is made
against that track "multiply by this gain factor when you play this
track". No data is changed, so the waveform isn't changed. When you play
the file back or export the program realises the volume is turned
up/down, and does the multiplications on the fly before mixing the
tracks and outputting them.

So if the waveform was to change as you used volume slider, it would be
misleading, because the waveform would be changed even though the data
it represents wouldn't be. When you start using level-sensitive effects
like the compressor, this distinction matters quite a lot.

Thanks for the suggestion, though. This probably should be clearer in
the documentation.

Richard Ash



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Re: Volume Reduction

Jorge Fábregas
On Sunday 01 January 2006 5:40 pm, Richard Ash wrote:

> The reason it doesn't happen is because the amplify effect changes the
> audio stored on disk, where as the volume slider doesn't.
>
> When you amplify a section, the data is read from the disk, multiplied
> by a number to do the amplification, and written back to disk in a new
> file, and then the waveform of that new file calculated and drawn. This
> is why it's quite slow.
>
> When you use the gain slider all that happens is that a note is made
> against that track "multiply by this gain factor when you play this
> track". No data is changed, so the waveform isn't changed. When you play
> the file back or export the program realises the volume is turned
> up/down, and does the multiplications on the fly before mixing the
> tracks and outputting them.
>
> So if the waveform was to change as you used volume slider, it would be
> misleading, because the waveform would be changed even though the data
> it represents wouldn't be. When you start using level-sensitive effects
> like the compressor, this distinction matters quite a lot.
>
> Thanks for the suggestion, though. This probably should be clearer in
> the documentation.

Thanks Richard for taking the time for this wonderful explanation. I now
really understand.

Thanks,
Jorge


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